#10 CONSIDER COMPUTER EYEWEAR

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#10  CONSIDER COMPUTER EYEWEAR

For the greatest comfort at your computer, you might benefit from having Dr. Landrio modify your eyeglasses prescription to create customized computer glasses. This is especially true if you normally wear contact lenses, which may become dry and uncomfortable during sustained computer work.

#9 MODIFY YOUR WORKSTATION

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#9  MODIFY YOUR WORKSTATION

Place written pages on a copy stand adjacent to the monitor if your work requires you to look back and forth between documents and the monitor. Light the copy stand properly and adjust your workstation and chair to the correct height. The computer screen should be 20-24″ from your eyes. The center of your screen should be about 10-15 degrees below your eyes for comfortable positioning of your head and neck

#7 EXERCISE YOUR EYES

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#7 EXERCISE YOUR EYES

Another cause of computer eye strain is focusing fatigue. To reduce the risk of tiring your eyes by constantly focusing on your screen, look away from your computer at least every 20 minutes and gaze at a distant object (at least 20 feet away) for at least 20 seconds. Some eye doctors call this the 20-20-20 rule. Another exercise is to look far away at an object for 10-15 seconds, then gaze at something up close for 10-15 seconds. Then look back at the distant object. Do this 10 times to avoid your eyes ‘locking up’ (a condition called accommodative spasm) after prolonged computer work.

#6 BLINK MORE OFTEN

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#6 BLINK MORE OFTEN

Blinking is very important when working on a computer; blinking moistens your eyes to prevent dryness and irritation. When working on a computer, people blink about 30% less than they normally would. The blinks also tend to be only partial lid closures. The tears that typically coat the front surface of the eye, evaporate more rapidly during these long non-blink phases which can cause dry eyes. If you experience dry eye symptoms, ask Dr. Landrio about artificial tear use. It is important to recognize that lubricating eye drops are not the same as those drops formulated to “get the red out.” The latter can indeed make your eyes look better but are not necessarily formulated to reduce dryness and irritation. To reduce your risk of dry eyes during computer use, try this exercise: Every 20 minutes, blink 10 times by closing your eyes as if falling asleep (very slowly). This will help to rewet your eyes.

#5 ADJUST YOUR SETTINGS

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#5 ADJUST YOUR SETTINGS

Generally these adjustments are beneficial:
-Adjust the brightness of the display so it’s approximately the same as the brightness of your surroundings.
-Text size and contrast should feel comfortable. Black print on a white background is the best combination. According to computer vision expert, Dr. James Sheedy, the text should be three times larger than the smallest text you can read from your normal viewing position.
-Reduce the color temperature on your display. The term color temperature refers to the spectrum of visible light. Blue light (short wavelength) is associated with more eye strain while the longer wavelength hues, such as orange and red, are better for long-term viewing.

#4 UPGRADE YOUR DISPLAY

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#4 UPGRADE YOUR DISPLAY

If you have not already done so, replace your old tube-style monitor with a flat-panel liquid crystal display (LCD), like those on laptop computers. LCD monitors are easier on the eyes and usually have an anti-glare surface. Older monitors can cause a noticeable “flicker” of images, which is a MAJOR cause of eye strain. When choosing a new flat panel display, select a screen with the highest resolution possible. Finally choose a relatively large display. For a desktop computer, select a display that has a diagonal screen size of at least 19 inches.